Archive for the ‘Uncategorized’ Category

Beacon of Hope or Symbol of Celanthropy?

Posted: December 13, 2010 by akl5086 in Charity, Children, Uncategorized

On Thursday, Dec. 9 crowds gathered to watch actress and UNICEF supporter Monique Coleman light the UNICEF Snowflake on Rodeo Drive in Beverly Hills, while singer Katharine McPhee sang her own renditions of popular Christmas tunes.

The snowflake is supposed to act as a beacon of hope, peace and compassion for children worldwide during the holiday season, but what do you think?

 

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They’re Backkkk….

Posted: December 8, 2010 by akl5086 in Africa, AIDs, Uncategorized

That’s right fans, your favorite celebs are back in the game. After one week of abstaining from using their social-networking accounts, celebs are logging back on to let fans know they are “alive!”

A single donation of $500,000 from pharmaceutical entrepreneur Stewart Rahr to the digital death AIDS campaign led by recording artist Alicia Keys on Monday, Dec. 6 marked the return of many popular celebs to the world of social media.

The donation was the grand finale to the AIDS campaign, which kicked off on World AIDS Day on Dec. 1.  

The campaign was anticipated to be much more successful than it proved to be and furthermore generated much criticism. Although celebs reached an outward of millions of people across the nation, they were only able to convince 50,000 fans to donate the minimum of $10 for the cause, making up the other half of the $1 million total.

Leigh Blake, co-founder of the charity Keep A Child Alive, said she never expected to raise the money overnight. She was actually blown away that they were able to raise that much in one week.

If this is true, however, why has the campaign received so much criticism?

If Blake was impressed with the “short length” of the campaign why have gossip sites made the campaign into a joke?

What do you think?

Determined or Destined for Failure?

Posted: December 6, 2010 by akl5086 in Africa, AIDs, Children, Uncategorized

As of Sunday night, the total amount raised for Alicia Keys‘ “Digital Death” Campaign was roughly $296,000. Now, five days into the campaign, celebs must be facing withdrawal.

I think the fact that donations haven’t been rolling in like they were expected to and the fact that celebs are still going relatively strong with the campaign shows determination, but what do you think?

Share your opinions or vote here!

Follow Up to Not the Thought

Posted: December 3, 2010 by brfrese in Uncategorized

So I just wanted to make a few comments about my last post.

I understand that it, in theory, did not mesh with the content of this blog. However, I think that it addressed an important issue not covered as frequently as we would have liked — not all philanthropy is good. We need to be careful about the level of involvement we have in some philanthropies, they might have adverse affects. I’ll leave you of an example of  T-shirts associated with celebrities (namely Tom Brady and the New England Patriots). These would have sold everywhere in the U.S….now you can see they were just given away. I wonder what the effect on their economy was?

Follow Up: World AIDS Day

Posted: December 1, 2010 by akl5086 in Uncategorized

Alicia Keys is "DEAD"

Today is December 1st; World AIDS day and day dedicated to raising $1 million dollars for Alicia Keys‘ charity, Keep A Child Alive. For 24 hours celebs including Kim Kardashian, Elijah Wood, Serena Williams will say goodbye to Twitter, Facebook and MySpace. That’s right fans, for the next 24 hours you will not know the whereabouts of your beloved celebs.

Check out the Photo Gallery of Celebs Playing Dead –> New York Post

I recently found an article from TIME Magazine called “Bad Charity,” and I thought I would share it with you all.

You can check out the full article here — it is really very insightful into our conceptions of charity work.

From Time Magazine

The article talks about a young man, Jason Sadler, who wanted to help out in Africa with a charity designed to donate T-shirts to Africa. He was, understandably so, surprised when he received harsh criticism from bloggers and anti-charity activists. He received this response for a few reasons:

1. T-shirts are not hard to get in Africa — an influx of free shirts to the market would bankrupt small entrepreneurs and those who vend shirts for a living.

2. The money spent shipping the shirts and supplies could better be used providing the impoverished areas with food and medical supplies they do not have.

One of his opponents was James Shikwati, a member of a Nairobi-based Inter Region Economic Think Tank, who found it ironic that after the second hand expansion of clothing into small towns shut down their textile industries, people who be interested in providing free shirts to the area.

He received additional criticism from a blogger who goes by the pseudonym “Tales from the Hood,” saying no level of rational debate seems to make an impact — sometimes people need to be yelled at for their charity because it isn’t making a difference.

He is, however, cooperating with his opponents and planning to readjust his charity model by donating shirts to orphanages who request them and to widows who can sell the shirts for profit. Sadler currently works with the founder of WaterIsLife.com, Ken Surritte, on his philanthropy efforts.

It is this kind of philanthropy we all assume is helping countries in other continents, but may actually be detrimental to their economic systems and ways of life. I want to know how you all feel about the way we look at charity and if we think it is always a good idea to get involved…even if we might be misinformed. Answer below!